One-List Master List Method to Reduce Stress

Current Status
Not Enrolled
Price
$9.99
Get Started

One-List Method for Time Management

 

“I have too many lists and I’m getting overwhelmed.”

It feels like I’m never going to get everything done with all these lists.”

“I feel like I’m constantly behind.”

If this sounds like you, then you need

an easy one-list method solution

Helping you move faster on the priorities that matter  

Reducing Stress and Improving Productivity

 

 

Need to be more Efficient?

We all know that making lists can be a great way to organize, but sometimes we feel overwhelmed by all of the lists we have. A list for this project and a list for that. It can be difficult to make efficient use of lists when we have too many. The One-List Master List course  helps the overwhelmed organize.

Do you need to be more efficient?

How many times have you felt like you were spinning your wheels because you couldn’t seem to focus on the most important tasks? You’re not alone. It’s easy to get bogged down when there are too many things on your plate and too many lists to manage.

This Course on Efficient use of lists will help you get organized, and show you how to make the most of your time and energy by learning how to create one list and use it effectively.

Hear from scientist turned entrepreneur Dr. Christina Blanchard-Horan. She is a serial business owner who manages three small businesses and staff. She offers a special method she uses to keep her sometimes pages long list organized and prioritized for success.

Getting Organized

hand drawn check box

The one-list method is a time management technique that makes efficient use of lists so you can focus on the most important tasks. This method involves creating one list that includes all of the tasks you need to complete. You can then prioritize, move tasks off the list, and re-prioritize your tasks. Making more efficient use of lists and ultimately improving your time management.

Let’s get started….

 One List Method

An easy system to reduce stress by tracking weekly activities more efficiently

 

By Christina Blanchard-Horan PhD

Introduction

i I’m Dr. Christina Blanchard-Horan. I’m author of this course and I’d like to take a moment to introduce myself.

I’ve worked in the healthcare field since graduating with my Master’s degree. I spent 20 years on contracts for Medicare, Medicaid, the Department of Health and Human Services, and the National Institutes of Health. In 2015, I moved on to start my own company GHL Solutions, then I started a small realestate rental company and then an ecommerce store. Needless to say I am super busy. I like it that way. But, it is a lot to organize.

I’ve had many people ask me how they can be more productive, and my answer has always been “organization.” It’s important for us as human beings not only keep track but also store our memories in some form or another so that when we need them later on down the line – whether it be for work purposes or personal interests alike-they’ll still come back with ease!

How to get organized

One of the best ways to stay organized is through a list.

People are usually surprised when I tell them that I have only one list.

Aside from using the art of delegation to help me get things done, which we can talk about in another course, I recognize the importance of remaining organized.  When I spoke of my One-List Method it made sense to create a course to help others use this easy-to-follow steps to simplifying your list.

So, let’s get started

One List Method

The way we “list” is personal. I get that. I  have always kept a regular weekly list. This is the system that we will be exploring in this course. I think it is important we make our definitions clear.

What do we mean by a One-List Method?

The One-List Method is a weekly accounting of everything that needs to get done, new activities that have landed in your lane. Whenever you think of something new you want to or need to do, write it on your list.  The list will be like an accordion. Some weeks you will get traction and knock the list down to a snail’s pace. Then catch your breath and find a new project or unexpected event has been added to the list and it grows again.

Calendar

Certainly, it is important to have a calendar to track appointments, so that you are notified electronically of appointments. There are a number of different options for calendars. Articles have been written on how to use calendars, (you may find this in our resources).  A calendar is a list of sorts. I actually tried using my calendar to track my list. It did not turn out well. 

Appointments

That’s not the list we are talking about here. When it comes to appointments, those are not lists either. Those are appointments. Now my list may contain some objective that is being addressed in the appointment. But, an appointment is a time appointed moment to discuss or work on items. The appointment may be on the list as an objective. Thus, Appointments go into a calendar and can be noted on the list when it falls during that week of activities.

I have used a written list for more than 20 years.  This method works for me and my staff. I track staff lists and it helps us ensure our work is getting done and we are on the same page. We operate from a numbered action list.  That is different from the One-List Method. That is my go-to, my things I want to get done. I developed this system after years of professional efficiency training, including Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, professional organization, personal and staff management courses, self improvement courses. I want to mention these because they all have influenced the outcome, this.

Daily To-Do

I think of my daily to-do as a sticky note. So, it’s not really a list, it’s a note of the things that are derived from the one-list. I’d like to do during the 24 hour period. No more. This is especially good if I need to go from one place to another or if my activities are coupled with any errands, post-office etc.

Signs of Overload


Pain
 or tension in your head, chest, stomach, or muscles. Your muscles tend to tense up when you’re stressed, and over time this can cause headachesmigraines, or musculoskeletal problems.

Digestive problems. These can include diarrhea and constipation, or nausea and vomiting. Stress can affect how quickly food moves through your system and the way your intestines absorb nutrients.

Reproductive issues. Stress can cause changes to your sex drive, problems with irregular or painful periods in women, or impotence and problems with sperm production in men. Whether you’re a man or a woman, you might also feel reduced sexual desire when you’re under too much stress.

Heart and blood pressure – problems include changes to your heart rate and blood pressure. When you’re overwhelmed with stress, your body goes into “fight-or-flight” mode, which triggers your adrenal glands to release the hormones cortisol and adrenaline. These can make your heart beat faster and your blood pressure rise.

Seeking Stress Relief

We all know that reducing stress is important. So why don’t we do it!. Well, it’s hard to do when our days are crammed full of obligations.

It feels like we’re constantly being pulled in a million different directions and we never have enough time to get everything done.

Tools

Reducing stress doesn’t have to be hard.  In fact, it can be really simple with the right tools.  There are a number of tools we can talk about, meditation, prayer, self reflection, mindfulness practices, and yoga and so on. But today we will talk about how we can reduce stress by being better prepared, organized and unloaded. The one-list solution is what we will talk about today. It can help you take control of your day –

Giving you More Time and Lessoning Stress

Definitions

The way we “list” is personal. I get that. I  have always kept a regular weekly list. This is the system that we will be exploring in this course. I think it is important we make our definitions clear.

What do we mean by a One-List Method?

The One-List Method is a weekly accounting of everything that needs to get done, new activities that have landed in your lane. Whenever you think of something new you want to or need to do, write it on your list.  The list will be like an accordion. Some weeks you will get traction and knock the list down to a snail’s pace. Then catch your breath and find a new project or unexpected event has been added to the list and it grows again.

Calendar

Certainly, it is important to have a calendar to track appointments, so that you are notified electronically of appointments. There are a number of different options for calendars.

An entire articles have been written on how to use calendars.  They are a list of sorts. But this is not what we are talking about. I actually tried using my calendar to track my list. It did not turn out well. 

I have used a written list for more than 20 years.  This method works for me and my staff. I track staff lists and it helps us ensure our work is getting done and we are on the same page. We operate from a numbered action list.  That is different from the One-List Method. That is my go-to, my things I want to get done. I developed this system after years of professional efficiency training, including Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, professional organization, personal and staff management courses, self improvement courses. I want to mention these because they all have influenced the outcome, this One-List Method.

If we are not talking about a calendar, what are we talking about? We track important appointments, keep daily to-do lists, make note of responsibilities, and track activities.

Daily To-Do

I think of my daily to-do as a sticky note. So, it’s not really a list, it’s a note of the things that are derived from the one-list. I’d like to do during the 24 hour period. No more. This is especially good if I need to go from one place to another or if my activities are coupled with any errands, post-office etc.

Appointments

That’s not the list we are talking about here. When it comes to appointments, those are not lists either. Those are appointments. Now my list may contain some objective that is being addressed in the appointment. But, an appointment is a time appointed moment to discuss or work on items. The appointment may be on the list as an objective. But, it much be structured and approved by other parties, which are not part of the “list function”.  Thus, Appointments go into a calendar and can be noted on the list if it falls during that week.

One-List

The function of the One-List Method is to note the objective that have been set for the week.  The list is aways a work in progress. It is not a stagnant thing. The list is constantly in motion. In order to track quickly, you need a tool that makes you comfortable. At the beginning of the week or over the weekend, go through the list. Not important upcoming appointments or objectives for the week.

 

One-List Method


I have used a written list for more than 20 years.  This method works for me and my staff. I track staff lists and it helps us ensure our work is getting done and we are on the same page.

 

I developed this system after years of professional efficiency training, including Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, professional organization, personal and staff management courses, self-improvement courses. I want to mention these because they all have influenced the outcome, this One-List Method.

 

 

What do we mean by a One-List Method?

The One-List Method is a weekly accounting of everything that needs to get done, new activities that have landed on your list. Whenever you think of something new you want to or need to do, write it on your list.  The list will be like an accordion. Some weeks you will get traction and knock the list down to a snail’s pace. Then catch your breath and find a new project or unexpected event has been added to the list and it grows again.

 

One-List

The function of the One-List Method is to note the objective that have been set for the week.  The list is aways a work in progress. It is not a stagnant thing. The list is constantly in motion. In order to track quickly, you need a tool that makes you comfortable.

 

Once you figure out your favorite way to keep your list, a notebook, notepad or iPad, let’s figure out how to build your list. Follow these instructions as much as they feel true for you.

For now, use a scratch piece of paper to start your list. Jot down the first part of your list, remembering to organize your list according to level of difficulty and priority.

For now, organize them from high to low priority.

You may want to group similar activities or project related to each other. Or you may prefer to simply jot things as they come.

If you like, you can organize your list and then decide on a color code. I sometimes highlight activities from the same project or those involving others. For example, everything involving XYZ customer would be colored in pink highlighting.

Activities involving preparation may also involve color coding. Essentially you are going to make your own key beyond the one-list method. But for now, let’s focus on the task at hand. Start your list. Then we’ll mark it up with our indicators.

 

LINK TO SHEET SAMPLE

BUY A BOOK

CREATE YOUR LIST

When to Create Your List

Create your list at the end of the week or over the weekend, if you have a regular work schedule. Basically, choose a time at the end of your week. That way tasks that emerged during the week will be fresh in your mind.

 NOTE: The first two hours of your day are likely to be your most productive. Your self-control is at its peak first thing in the morning, so this is the best time to make yourself do the stuff you really would rather not do.

 

Mark up your List

 

In the One-List Method, prioritization mark-up involves three easy steps. Each item has  a box next to the activity or task. These images show how I marked my list when I first began developing the method.

Looking at the figure on the left side of the slide you can see that the highest priority tasks are marked with an asterisk.  This indicates that these are tasks that should be done today or as soon as possible. 

You will also notice a little dollar sign. Put that symbol in front of any action item involving money. This will help motivate you to prioritize base in part on a cost and benefit analysis.

 The next items to prioritize are the high priority items that may or may not get done today. These have an up arrow.

The lowest priority are items that may come off the list. These you should indicate with a down arrow.

It is important to note that not all items get prioritized. This should only be items that have a timeline or importance above everything else and you want to indicate this. These can be removed or lowered and /or raised in priority depending upon the situation.

On the right side of the slide, you see under the word “Action” there are boxes that have been completed. At the end of the week or whenever your list gets too messy to follow, or you just feel like cleaning it up and creating a new list, each and every box should have one of these marks in it. These are the most critical part to keep items from falling off of your list.

The arrow pointing right indicates the action was moved to a new list. A check mark indicates the action was completed and an x means it has been removed from our action item list. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keywords

Productivity, organization, stress relief, one List method, master list journaling book, checklists, to-dos, calendar appointments

One-list method

One-entry

 

 

 

Sample Sheet

I had learned from experimentation that I needed something simple, easy to use, always accessible. I had tried for years to get an application for my phone. Not until recently has that become a reality.  The One-List Method can be used in any number of ways. You can create your list on a blank piece of paper with a pen or pencil, as you’ll see in the next slide. Or, you can download the sheets that come with the course. Print and bind them. That is an option. Or you can order a book using the link in the course under resources. Lastly, soon you’ll be able to download the app for Free with an annual fee of $5.99.

Powered By MemberPress WooCommerce Plus Integration