Interview

Dr. Chuen-Yen Lau

Chuen-Yen Lau slide set cover page ghliaisons hivcovidtalks

Slide Presentation on “Intersection of HIV and SARS-CoV-2” by Dr. Chuen-Yen Lau, HIV Dynamics and Replication Program, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health

Bio – Chuen-Yen Lau MD, MS, MPH 

Chuen-Yen Lau completed an internal medicine residency at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and an infectious diseases fellowship at the NIH and served as the sole internist for Blantyre Adventist Hospital in Malawi.  In 2004, Chuen-Yen joined NIAID to support clinical evaluation of HIV vaccine candidates, continued that work in the Military HIV Research Program from 2009-2011, and then returned to NIAID to support multifaceted international infectious disease research partnerships with a focus on Indonesia.  She joined the HIV Dynamics and Replication Program in the National Cancer Institute in 2020 to conduct translational research to identify, characterize and target HIV reservoirs including through the development of novel PET imaging ligands.

She joined the HIV Dynamics and Replication Program in the National Cancer Institute in 2020 to conduct translational research to identify, characterize and target HIV reservoirs including through development of novel PET imaging ligands.  Chuen-Yen is also an adjunct associate professor at USUHS and serves as a reviewer for several scientific journals.

One component Chuen-Yen’s current research focuses on development of camelid single domain antibodies (nanobodies) as PET imaging ligands.  Nanobodies are particularly attractive for CNS imaging applications because they can cross the blood brain barrier.  Several nanobodies are currently undergoing evaluation.  Once optimized, the radiolabeled nanobodies will be used in human studies.

Two clinical studies focus on understanding HIV dynamics, genetic structures and mechanisms of viral persistence.  The first is a treatment interruption study currently under development.  Imaging strategies will be used to facilitate sampling and characterization of reactivated reservoirs, including in the central nervous system.

The second study is an ongoing natural history study of HIV in people from whom we have data prior to the start of antiretroviral therapy.  Both of these studies provide potential opportunities for the application of nanobody-based imaging strategies for reservoir characterization.

Publications

Highlighted publication  Southeast Asia Infectious Disease Clinical Research Network. Causes and Outcomes of Sepsis in Southeast Asia: a multinational multicentre cross-sectional study. Lancet Global Health. 2017; 5(2):e157-e167

Highlighted publication Louis G, Sophia S, Limmathurotsakul D, Kamaludi A, Karyana M, Lau C. Open Access Data Sharing: Experience and Lessons Learned in South East Asia. BMJ. 2016; 355: I5363

Highlighted publication Lau C, Mihalek AD, Wang J, Dodd LE, Perkins K, Price S, Webster S, Pittaluga S, Folio LR, Rao VK, Olivier K. Pulmonary manifestations of the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS): a retrospective study of a unique patient cohort. Annals of the American Thoracic Society. 2016; 13(8): 1279-88.

See more in the link below

 

Chen Yen Lau CCRB

 – Interview Highlights

Nano & Neuro – HIV Science

Chuen-Yen is a clinical research physician at the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland.  Chuen-Yen joined NIAID to support clinical evaluation of HIV vaccine candidates, continued that work while in the Military HIV Research Program, and then returned to NIAID in 2011 to support international infectious disease research partnerships in Indonesia.

Dr. Marsha Greene interviews Dr. Chuen-Yen Lau in this interview. She speaks to us about current recommendations for people with HIV and COVID.

 

Marsha Greene, PhD

Marsha Greene, PhD

Interviewer & GHL Associate

Dr. Greene is an experienced clinical research professional skilled in clinical trials protocol development, program development, regulatory oversight, and policy development.  In her 14 years professional career, Ms. Greene has worked on a diverse array of projects encompassing infectious disease, cancer, socio-behavioral issues, and the impacts of emerging biotechnologies on human health and national security.

 

More about Marsha

What we do know is that people with HIV in developing countries have had an interruption in their care.

– Dr Chuen-Yen Lau
Chen Yen Lau CCRB

Contact Me

Get In Touch

Dr. Chuen-Yen Lau joined the HIV Dynamics and Replication Program in the National Cancer Institute in 2020 to conduct translational research to identify, characterize and target HIV reservoirs including through the development of novel PET imaging ligands.  In addition to her work at NIH, Chuen-Yen is an adjunct associate professor at USUHS and serves as a reviewer for several scientific journals.

Two clinical studies focus on understanding HIV dynamics, genetic structures, and mechanisms of viral persistence.  The first is a treatment interruption study currently under development.  Imaging strategies will be used to facilitate sampling and characterization of reactivated reservoirs, including in the central nervous system. 

The second study is an ongoing natural history study of HIV in people for whom we have data prior to the start of antiretroviral therapy.  Both of these studies provide potential opportunities for the application of nanobody-based imaging strategies for reservoir characterization. 

National Institutes of Health

Chuen-Yen Lau

Clinical Research Physician